Lesson 154: Ask For #1 | English Phrasal Verbs with Explanations | Phrasal Verbs

Lesson 154: Ask For #1 | English Phrasal Verbs With Explanations

Ask For #1 English Phrasal Verb

We are going to learn one of the several different meanings for the English phrasal verb ‘Ask For ‘ and we will explain that it means to provoke a negative reaction. Read our examples below so you have the best idea of how this is used in a real English conversation.

 

Phrasal Verb: Ask For

by Real English Conversations | Phrasal Verb Course

Podcast Listener Bonus: Free Lessons Here

Phrasal Verbs Lesson: Ask For #1

Alternative Meaning: To provoke a negative reaction

Example 1:

  • If you pick a fight with someone you will get what you ask for.
  • If you pick a fight with someone you are provoking it and will have one.

Example 2:

  • You’re asking for trouble if you go downtown.
  • You’re provoking trouble if you go downtown.

 

The English Phrasal Verbs Course

Learning phrasal verbs from a list is not the best way to do it. You need to learn the meaning of phrasal verbs through the context of a situation. In our English phrasal verb course, you will get two examples using the phrasal verb in each lesson. Once you have studied 10 lessons, you can test your knowledge using the phrasal verb stories.

The phrasal verb stories are the key to helping you understand the verbs that have multiple meanings and to comprehend what the phrasal verbs mean when you hear them. To learn more about the course and see an example of the lessons you will receive Click Here.

Please share this lesson if you thought it was helpful and leave a comment below using an example if you want to receive a correction 🙂

Follow Us Online Here:

phrasal verb story

Get Your Free Lessons Now!

  • 20 phrasal verb lessons
  • 2 phrasal verb stories
  • PDF transcripts
  • MP3 Downloads


 

250 Phrasal Verb Lessons with 25 Stories

Start understanding phrasal verbs that you hear in everyday conversation. Our audio lessons give you the training you need with PDF transcriptions to master English phrasal verbs.

Follow Us Online Here:

Learning to Speak English – Knowledge vs. Skills

Have you ever learned a new sport? When you speak English, it kind of feels the same…

how to speak english betterLearning a language is a really interesting process and sometimes it can help to think about something from a different perspective. I wanted to share a comparison between learning English and learning a new sport to try to explain how speaking uses a different part of the brain, which is why it feels so difficult to speak English in the beginning.

Let’s Learn How to Ski!!

I am Canadian, so I am going to talk about a very popular sport that we enjoy doing in the mountains during the winter. If you decided you wanted to learn how to ski, the best advice would be to get a lesson so you have some knowledge about what you need to do with your body to successfully ski down a hill.

Knowledge or Facts You Need to Ski: The instructor wants to make sure you know how to turn and stop. So, he tells you to put more pressure on your right leg to start turning as soon as you start to go down the hill.

Developing the Skills: The first time you try to do this, you start putting pressure on your leg, but the ski does not turn very much and you fall down to stop. However, after trying to do the same thing several times, you learn how to turn to do a turn and stop!

learning to speak english is like a sport

Comparing Skiing to English Speaking

In order to speak English you need to start with some basic cactus studying englishknowledge (which you already have), such as basic pronunciation, some vocabulary and a few grammar rules like how to conjugate a verb.

The ‘knowledge’ of the words and how to put them together in a sentence is information that is stored in one part of the brain. However, when you try to speak English you are trying to do an ‘action’ based on the knowledge you have. You are refering to your English knowledge, one piece at a time, while you try to speak out loud.

Every time that you use a new word or grammar structure while speaking, you are developing your speaking ‘skills’. Skills are developed when you use ‘knowledge’ with ‘action’. At first, speaking is slow and uncomfortable, but the more often that you use the most common words and grammar structures, it becomes easier!

Ski Lesson #2 – Advancing your Skills 

Once you have learned how to turn and stop, you need to learn how to connect your turns without stopping. Your instructor will give you more of the ‘knowledge’ that you will need to attempt that activity. As you try to connect the turns, you are thinking about how you are supposed to do the activity until you develop the skills to just do it.

Speaking With Having to ‘Think’

group speaking englishThe first time you learn a new skill skiing, you have to think about every single movement because you are trying to apply the knowledge that your instructor gave you to develop a certain skill.

When you first start trying to speak English you will also need to think about every word you use and how to correctly use the grammar until you are comfortable with using those words.

The cool thing is that after you use the same words and verbs over and over again… you don’t have to think about them as much. If you practice speaking enough, you will be able to respond most of the time without thinking about vocabulary or grammar.

 

Active Vocabulary vs. Passive Vocabulary

Have you ever noticed that when you try to speak, very often you cannot remember a certain word? But, when you hear that same word or you see it while reading, you recognize it. That is the difference between active vocabulary and passive vocabulary.

Active vocabulary is the set of words that you can instantly recall when speaking. You don’t need to stop and remember what the word is before saying it. Having active vocabulary shows that you have practiced speaking and have developed speaking ‘skills’.

Passive vocabulary is the type of vocabulary that you have stored in the ‘knowledge’ department of your brain. You might be able to remember it eventually, but you have to stop your speaking in order to remember it.

activate your english vocabularyPassive vocabulary is basically useless when you are speaking. It is like reading about ‘how to ski’ compared to trying to ski down a hill. The facts you learned about skiing, do not make you a good skier.  You need to train your body how to react without thinking.

Once your brain has used vocabulary or grammar it is easier to recall for the next time it is needed. You have started to activate the vocabulary which makes it easier to use every time you need it.

 

The Fastest Way to ‘Activating’ Your English Knowledge

Trying to speak English is the fastest way to use vocabulary in an active way. The good news is that you can practice speaking about anything and you don’t even need a practice partner. Look up the words you do not know or cannot remember and immediately use them in several sentences.

Easy Activities

Start by trying to talk about what you are doing now, what are your plans for later in the week or what you did yesterday.

More Challenging Topics

Watch a video, listen to some audio or read about something. Try to explain what the topic was about. Start with a general summary of 2 or 3 sentences, later try to give as much detail as possible.

When you start to recognize the difference between ‘knowing’ English and ‘using’ English, it can help you understand why it feels so difficult. Keep in mind the comparison to learning a new sport and you should have more patience with the process of developing your speaking skills.

Do you think speaking in English is like a sport? What did you think about this article? Leave a comment below.

Real English Conversations Small Logo 250x250Follow Our Blog Here

Get the latest articles that we share on this blog plus other helpful advice for intermediate to advanced level English learners



How to Make an English Study Plan for Learning Outside of the Classroom

Real English Conversations Small Logo 250x250Follow Our Blog Here

Get the latest articles that we share on this blog plus other helpful advice for intermediate to advanced level English learners



Which Skills Do You Need to Improve

When you decide to start studying English on your own, it can be very challenging to know what to focus on to help you to continue to improve. This guide will help you create a study plan to organize and prioritize the skills you want to improve so that you can learn faster than learning in a classroom!

It can be overwhelming to try to improve all of your skills at the same time. With this plan you are only going to focus on 3 skills so that you will see improvement after a month of completing your study plan. Start by deciding on 3 skills you want to improve the most.

Here’s a list of ideas:

  • Speaking
  • Listening
  • Vocabulary
  • Writing
  • Pronunciation
  • Speaking Fluency
  • Speaking Faster
  • Comprehending Fast English
  • Sounding More ‘Native’ or Natural when speaking

customer service agent speak fluently

Real Life Example:

Sara wants to feel more confident communicating in English for her
job. She has to talk to clients over the phone and some of them are English speaking.

The 3 skills Sara is going to focus on this month for her study plan are:

  1. Speaking Fluency
  2. Listening Comprehension
  3. Using New Vocabulary

Get a Copy of Sara's Study Plan

See the study plan that Sara will use to improve: download the study plan template

  • speaking fluency
  • listening comprehension
  • vocabulary

Get the Study Plan

Finding techniques and resources

Now that you know which skills you want to improve, you need to find techniques and resources that will help you to use and develop the skills. Be creative with ideas to practice using each skill. We will continue using the example with Sara:

Skill #1: Speaking Fluency Strategy and Activity

Sara needs to find a technique or activity to practice her speaking fluency. She is able to write well, but she is not happy with her ability to speak without pausing to think.

She decides to try a speaking fluency technique that she found on our website at Real English Conversations. The activity suggests that you find a story, video or audio to study then you try speaking out loud about it. The fluency key, is repeating your answer at least 3 times. You can read the full article that explains the speaking fluency exercise here.

Sara likes to watch videos on you tube so she finds an interesting channel with ‘Top 10’ videos like the one below.  She will pause the video after each segment and try to explain what the video was talking about 3 times. She will also use the speaking practice questions that are part of the Premium Membership on our website.

Skill #2: Listening Comprehension ActivityEnglish listening skills thumb

To practice listening comprehension, she needs to have transcriptions with audio or videos with subtitles. She will use the transcriptions from the conversations we have available. Every time she cannot understand the audio perfectly, she will rewind it and listen again. Sara identified her problems with listening in this article about how to improve listening skills.

 

Skill #3: Vocabulary Building

Sara took English classes for many years and she knows that the vocabulary she learned is different than what American English speakers use in everyday life. She will be studying the transcriptions from our Real English Conversation lesson to find everyday vocabulary and to look for phrases that are used to pause while thinking.

 

Measure your starting level

In order to know if you have improved, it is important to take note of your current ability with each skill. This is also helpful to keep you motivated

Do an activity or a lesson that uses each skill that you will be trying to improve. Do the activity and make notes about what was difficult for you and where you would like to improve.

If your goal is to improve your speaking fluency, you can record a 2-5 minute audio or video recording of yourself trying to explain something, perhaps the reason why you need to improve your speaking fluency.

Get Your Copy of the Study Plan Template

Being organized will help you to stay focused on the skills you want to improve. download the study plan template

  • A Study Schedule Template
  • Progress Tracker
  • Goal Setting Worksheet

Get the Study Plan

Make a weekly plan to do the work you need to do

scheudle for your study plan

Now you know the skills you will be focusing on and which activities you can do to improve the skills. Next, you need to prioritize the skills. Choose the skill that needs to improve the most out of the 3 skills, then choose the second most important skill to improve. Of course, the 3rd skill is the lower priority.

If you have very little time to study each week, less than 3 hours, I recommend only focusing on 2 skills. Whenever possible, do activities that use both skills in the practice activities.

Think about your schedule and how many hours per week you can commit to studying and practicing English. Fill out a weekly schedule to follow which activity you will practice on each day.

This is how you should split your time in the study plan:

  • 40% on the main skill to improve
  • 30% on the second skill
  • 20% on the third skill
  • 10% on grammar

Enter the activities into your calendar with the activities  and the time you will spend doing each activity into the calendar. Obviously, you should schedule more activities that focus on the main skill you want to improve. If possible do activities that use multiple skills at the same time. Get the worksheet you can use to make your own schedule here

Only study one grammar point per week. Learning grammar in small parts will not help with speaking and listening fluency but it is important to slowly learn new grammar tips to help you speak properly.

Measure your resultsprogress with the study plan

After one month of doing the exercises and activities to help you improve certain skills, it is time to measure your results.

Do the same lesson or activities that you did at the beginning of the month to test your starting level. If you recorded a video or audio to measure you speaking fluency, you need to record another audio or video talking about the same topic.

Think about each activity and if it felt easier or harder. Compare your speaking to see if you think you have improved.

 

Make your plan for the next month

You should be able to see some progress with your skills. Now you will know which activities you like and which ones you don’t. More importantly, you will know which activities were the most helpful versus the ones that did not seem to improve your language skills.

Follow the steps in this plan again, where you decide which skills you want to improve and do it again. After one or two months, the skill you feel you need to improve the most might be better than another skill. As you make progress in the language, you can expect that the skills you need to improve will change and the activities you need to do will become harder or will require a more detailed answer.

Leave me a comment below to say which 3 skills you want to improve this month! If you need some ideas about what to study, I will respond to your comment. Please share this article if you think it will help someone else 🙂

Lesson 148: Cut Out #1 | English Phrasal Verb Course and Lessons

Cut Out English Phrasal Verb

There are three ways you can use the English Phrasal Verb ‘Cut Out’. We will teach you how to use it to talk about when the power, sound or electricity suddenly stops working. This phrasal verb lesson includes our excellent examples of using this phrasal verb in the same way native English speakers do.

 

Phrasal Verb: Cut Out

by Real English Conversations | Phrasal Verb Course

Podcast Listener Bonus: Free Lessons Here

Phrasal Verbs Lesson: Cut Out #1

Alternative Meaning:  When the power, electricity or sound suddenly stops working

Example 1:

  • The power cut out for 2 hours during the storm last night.
  • The electricity was unavailable for 2 hours during the storm last night.

Example 2:

  • The microphone was cutting out while the director was speaking to the crowd.
  • The sound on the microphone was interrupted while the director was speaking to the crowd.

The English Phrasal Verbs Course

Learning phrasal verbs from a list is not the best way to do it. You need to learn the meaning of phrasal verbs through the context of a situation. In our phrasal verb course, you will get two examples using the phrasal verb in each lesson. Once you have studied 10 lessons, you can test your knowledge using the phrasal verb stories.

The phrasal verb stories are the key to helping you understand the verbs that have multiple meanings and to comprehend what the phrasal verbs mean when you hear them. To learn more about the course and see an example of the lessons you will receive Click Here.

Please share this lesson if you thought it was helpful and leave a comment below using an example if you want to receive a correction 🙂

Follow Us Online Here:

phrasal verb story

Get Your Free Lessons Now!

  • 20 phrasal verb lessons
  • 2 phrasal verb stories
  • PDF transcripts
  • MP3 Downloads


 

250 Phrasal Verb Lessons with 25 Stories

Start understanding phrasal verbs that you hear in everyday conversation. Our audio lessons give you the training you need with PDF transcriptions to master English phrasal verbs.

Follow Us Online Here: