Podcast

35. Carnival in Colombia (English Podcast Conversation Lesson)

english conversation carnival pic

We’ve been gone from recording conversations for more than a year but we are back with a new English podcast format that is better than ever!

In this English conversation, we are going to tell you about our experiences visiting Colombia during their world-famous Carnival. We discuss the difference it can make when you know someone who is from the region you are visiting and how you can really have the opportunity to discover the culture on another level.

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English Conversation Tip:

If you have a question, send it to us: contact@realenglishconversations.com

We answer our Hassan’s question about a problem he is having with listening.

Dear Amy and Curtis,

I’ve been learning English for 3 years but I’ve noticed I have a lot of problems with my listening. I feel like I listen to a lot of audio, maybe 1 hour a day. When I watch movies with subtitles, I know most of the words… but I am not able to hear the words when I listen without subtitles. Please help me. 

Read the article related to Amy’s advice on listening deeper here.

Video about slowing down audio: Using Audacity to improve listening skills

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Real English Podcast Conversations Podcast

English Podcast Episode 35: Carnival in Colombia

34: Funerals – English Conversation Podcast

In this conversation we discuss the sensitive topic of death and funerals. We wanted to make sure that you had access to the best things to say to someone to express your sympathy for their pain and loss. We also know that these situations are very difficult to talk about and we give you a few examples of how to say the right things to people that are going through this part of life.

Check out a preview of the transcription and audio player near the bottom of this page.english conversations funerals

Links: 

View the English podcast episode on our website here to leave a comment on our Facebook comment area.

Real English Conversation Tip:

Hear some of the most expressions people use to talk about someone who is really old or who has died.

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English Podcast Transcription Preview:

Amy:  Hey guys, this is Amy and Curtis here. And we thought today we would discuss a topic that is pretty difficult, even for native speakers to talk about in a sensitive way. And that is talking about someone who has recently died.

Curtis:  Right.

Amy:  To a family member or a close friend, somebody who knew that person.

Curtis:  Yeah.

Amy:  That is probably suffering from a loss.

Curtis:  Um-hum. Of some sort.

Amy:  Yeah. Like they’re having some pain associated with that person not being in their life anymore.

Curtis:  Yeah.

Amy:  So what is a common word, that…or a verb that we use instead of saying someone has died?

Curtis:  Someone has passed away.

Amy:  Yeah, or passed on.

Curtis:  Yeah.

Amy:  Those are…those are really common. So when we do say to die though, it’s just…we use that more when we’re talking about someone that we didn’t know.

Curtis:  Yeah, something less personal.

Amy:  Yeah, so if it’s somebody, like you’re talking to somebody, and it was their relative or their friend, you’d probably want to use the word pass away.

Curtis:  Yeah.

Amy:  But if it’s just talking about a news event that happened, like for example, there was a tragic1 accident on the highway, and three people died on scene, or whatever. You know, I guess you could say three people passed away, but it doesn’t…it doesn’t sound right.

End of the English podcast transcription preview to get the full transcription visit this page.

Real English Podcast Conversations Podcast

English Podcast Episode 34: Funerals

33. Applying for Jobs – Free English Conversation Podcast

Getting a job should be one of the first steps to take in your future.In this free English conversation we talk about applying for a job and some of the most interesting methods we used to get one. Hear about some of our experiences applying for jobs as well as when we hired people for our own business. Please share with us some ideas that worked for you in order to get hired.

Check out a preview of the transcription and audio player near the bottom of this page.applying for jobs english conversations

Real English Conversation Tip:

We talk about a popular expression that we use to say you have a lead or an opportunity for a job offer.

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English Podcast Transcription Preview:

Curtis:  Well, hey, guys. It’s Curtis, and I’m hanging out with Amy. We’re from RealEnglishConversations.com. Today we’re going to kind of continue our conversation about jobs, and applying for them, actually.

Amy:  In the last episode we talked about resumes. And what was normal to see in a North American resume. And comparing it to a resume that we’ve recently seen from another culture or another country.

Curtis:  Yeah, from Colombia, and it was 27 pages long.

Amy:  Yeah. The total opposite of a North American resume, which is like a…the most concentrated summary you can possibly imagine of your work history.

Curtis:  Yeah, they’re almost opposites.

Amy:  Yeah. Complete opposites. So, anyway, we thought that obviously the next step, now that you have a resume.

Curtis:  Yeah, you’ve created a resume.

Amy:  This is the first step in applying for a job.

Curtis:  Yeah.

Amy:  What do you do?

Curtis:  Well, you go out there, and hand out your resume to the places that you would probably prefer to work at. Sometimes, you know, you can’t get too picky if you really need a job really bad, you apply everywhere.

Amy:  Right.

Curtis:  So you’ve got your stack of resumes with you, and then you go out there and you walk into businesses or places with that resume. You ask for the boss or the manager, that does the hiring, usually, that’s what I would do, that’s who I want to give my resume to.

Amy:  Yeah, can I speak to the manager, please.

Curtis:  Yeah, you want to make that…

Amy:  That’s where you would…you’re using…

Curtis:  First impression.

Amy:  The most formal speech that you possibly can, but, yeah, can I speak with the manager, please is definitely, I mean, if you’re making a complaint at a restaurant, you would say the same thing, but if you’re applying for a job, it’s, oh, hi, I was wondering if the manager is around, I’d like to speak with them.

 

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Real English Podcast Conversations Podcast

English Podcast Episode 33: Applying for Jobs

30. Airport Travel – Free English Conversation Podcast

Take a trip with us and explore a Real English Conversation. Amy and Curtis talk about travelling through airports with people who speak a different language than them. Hear about some of the experiences where it was really helpful to know a basic level of another language while travelling and communicating important information. This is our full Free English Conversation for the month and it is available on our English Podcast and website.

Check out a preview of the English Podcast transcription and audio player near the bottom of this page.airport travel english conversations

Links: 

View the English podcast episode on our website here to leave a comment on our Facebook comment area.

Real English Conversation Tip:

How to talk about different time zones when you are travelling or you need to set up an appointment with someone who lives in another part of the world.

 

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English Podcast Transcription Preview:

Amy:  Hey, guys, this is Amy and Curtis, and today we’re going to do a conversation that one of our listeners actually suggested to us. So who was that?

Curtis:  That was Alfredo. And he’s living in Venezuela.

Amy:  No, he is from Venezuela.

Curtis:  Oh, okay. Where’s he living?

Amy:  He’s living in Argentina and working as a pilot.

Curtis:  Oh, that’s a cool job.

Amy:  So what did he ask us to talk about?

Curtis:  Well, because he is a pilot, he asked us to talk about some of our experiences in airports.

Amy:  And specifically doing it in another language.

Curtis:  Yeah. This can be tricky at times.

Amy:  Yeah, so if you guys have been listening to the podcasts for a while, you’re going to know we’ve done quite a bit of travelling. I mean, where have we been? We’ve been to…we went to Hawaii.

Curtis:  Yeah.

Amy:  And we’ve been to California.

Curtis:  We’ve been to Costa Rica.

Amy:  Yeah. Costa Rica, Nicaragua, Panama, Ecuador. And upcoming we have a trip planned to Ecuador again. And to Colombia. And this next vacation is going to be three months, and I think we might be able to this time when we go to the airports, we might actually have an experience to do the whole process of the customs and like checking in with the customs agent and getting our passports stamped and stuff. I think we might be able to do it completely in Spanish this time.

Curtis:  Yeah. I’m feeling a little more confident, that’s for sure.

Amy:  Yeah. So the last times that we’ve travelled, we’ve really had a fairly limited level of the language.

Curtis:  Yes.

Amy:  You know, because I know when we came back from Ecuador, after we came back, after I had been there for six weeks, I was still just a beginner, looking back now. I thought I was  than I was, but looking back now I can see I was…I was pretty basic.

Curtis:  And I…I was basic basic.

Amy:  You were like a newbie1, like…

 

End of the English podcast transcription preview to get the full transcription visit this page.

Real English Podcast Conversations Podcast

English Podcast Episode 30: Airport Travel

27. Forest Fires – Free English Conversation Podcast

In this English podcast conversation we discuss some recent forest fires that have started in the area where we live, how firefighters work against the fires and the procedures that are in place to help people and animals that need to be evacuated if a fire is near to their homes. Hear about what some people do to watch these sometimes dangerous situations and the nickname we give them.

Check out a preview of the transcription and audio player near the english conversation about forest firesbottom of this page.

Links: 

View the English podcast episode on our website here to leave a comment on our Facebook comment area.

Real English Conversation Tip:

Hear about what a looky-loo is and what they do when an emergency situation is happening.

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Come to our helpful and interesting website

Check out this Blog where Amy tells you about the challenges and experiences she has encountered learning a second language.

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English Podcast Transcription Preview:

Curtis:  Hey, everybody. It’s Amy and Curtis from RealEnglishConversations.com and today we’re going to be talking about a natural disaster that happens in our area where we live, and it’s forest fires. Now what are forest fires, Amy?

Amy:  Well, forest fires are fires obviously that start in the forest, just like it sounds. But these are…are accidents or sometimes they’re caused naturally.

Curtis:  Yes.

Amy:  But it’s a fire that is wild in the forest, it’s…it’s uncontrolled.

Curtis:  Yes.

Amy:  It’s unintentional that it’s there. So for example, a forest fire might start by being either human caused, which would make it an accident.

Curtis:  Yeah.

Amy:  Or it might be something in nature that has happened. So what happens in nature that causes forest fires to start?

Curtis:  Well, sometimes thunderstorms.

Amy:  Yeah.

Curtis:  Come through our area and with thunderstorms is lightning, of course.

Amy:  Yeah. And lightning strikes1a can definitely start fires.

Curtis:  Yeah.

Amy:  Like if a lightning bolt1b hits a tree it will light on fire.

Curtis:  On fire. And it’s because forest fire season is in the summertime. And everything around us is super dry, so a fire will start quicker.

Amy:  Yeah. So if it has been raining, and there was a lightning strike that hit a tree in the forest, it wouldn’t likely start a fire. Like it might…that tree might burn, or get charred a little bit, but it’s not going to start a fire. But right now what’s happened is we’ve had the hottest and driest summer in…isn’t it over 50 years or something like that2?

Curtis:  Something like that.

Amy:  Yeah. So we’ve had very little rain and extremely hot temperatures, so it…in the forest, it’s so dry. If there’s like, for example, human caused, like a cigarette butt, a lit cigarette butt that is flicked out the window.

Curtis:  Yeah.

Amy:  And it lands in a ditch with some dry grass, what happens?

Curtis:  It takes within seconds for a fire…

Amy:  Yeah, a grass fire to start.

 

End of the English podcast transcription preview to get the full transcription visit this page.

Real English Podcast Conversations Podcast

English Podcast Episode #27: Forest Fires

Lesson 19: English Phrasal Verb Pass Out

phrasal verb Pass OutOur English phrasal verb lesson is pass out it is used to describe someone who is unconscious. Often we will use the verb to describe when a person that has drank to much alcohol has fallen asleep. Listen to the audio and, complete the exercise below to check if you know how to use it in context the way English speakers will use it .

Using the Phrasal Verb: Pass Out

Decide which sentence uses the phrasal verb ‘Pass Out’ correctly? Leave a comment on our website in the comment section below with your answer.

A. The van passed out the other car on the highway.

B. The man passed out from the heat.

C. The passed man out from the heat.

English Phrasal Verb Course

When you come to Sign up as a Premium Member at our website all the phrasal verb lessons we have available are accessible. Also, you will get over 6 hours of all the conversational English that includes audio transcripts, speaking exercises, vocabulary explanations with examples and more!  Click Here today to sign up.